Tag Archives: Retirement

5 Ways to Save for Retirement When You Have Student Loan Debt

Graduation caps have landed, tassels have been switched to the other side, and mom has all the pictures she could ever want. Graduation day is one of the most memorable occasions in a person’s lifetime, but as seventy percent of new grads know, it also starts the countdown to one of life’s most-dreaded evils: paying back student loans. Recent research suggests millennials are now spending one fifth of their annual salaries on student loans alone, and now expect to be making payments well into their forties. At the same time, most millennials know they need to start saving for retirement in their twenties – from their first day at their first job if possible – but when Sallie Mae comes knocking it can seem impossible to both pay back debt and save for retirement on an entry level salary.

 

So how can you manage your student loan debt and also make sure you have enough to retire comfortably?

 

Here are a few tips to get started:

1. Create a budget

Your first step should be to come up with a plan outlining your long-term financial priorities, including everything from paying off student loans and contributing to retirement to having immediate funds for an emergency. You can’t focus on realizing long term goals when you’re trapped lurching from one immediate crisis to the next. Take some time to breathe and focus on the future.

 

2. Manage your payment plans

While getting out of debt can seem like a more urgent priority, make sure you are on track to meet your retirement goals before accelerating your student loan debt payoff date. According to a Morningstar report, every dollar of student loan debt creates a 35 cent decrease in retirement savings. Try to put at least 10-20 percent of your income throughout your working years aside for retirement. This enables you to take advantage of compounding interest and the time value of money, so you’ll actually end up with more money by the time you retire. Automation makes managing this process easier, so you don’t need to think twice about it!

 

3. Take advantage of employer matching policies

Does your employer match contributions or participate in a pre-tax retirement saving plan? You could be earning a higher rate of return by making sure you’re participating in and capitalizing on those policies. New company, new plan? No problem! Look into rolling over your 401(k) to maximize your benefits. Sometimes money does grow on trees.

 

4. Refinance your existing debt

If you have good to excellent credit and a steady cash flow you’re a prime candidate for loan refinancing. Look for a new loan with a lower interest rate, and make sure you use all the money from the new loan to pay off the old one. Some banks and loan providers also offer loyalty and automation discounts, so you should also make sure you’re familiar with all the options available to you before you sign on the dotted line.

 

5. Keep an eye on pesky fees

Three in four Americans have no idea what they’re paying in 401(k) fees, and nearly 40 percent believe they’re not paying any fees at all. When’s the last time you checked what you’re paying in fees? It’s not enough to just save money if you end up losing thousands of dollars in fees you don’t even know you’re paying. Signing up for Blooom’s 401(k) robo-advisor to manage your 401(k) and minimize those pesky fees costs a flat fee of $10 per month, no matter how much you have saved. No small print, no tricks.

 

Still feel like you’re drowning in debt? Check out blooom’s free 401(k) checkup tool to see how you’re doing with your retirement savings plan.

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What Kind of 401k Lover Are You?

Valentine’s Day puts a lot of focus on being in a relationship. If you’re reading this blog it probably means that you ARE in a relationship with your 401k, which is great! But just because you’re in a relationship doesn’t mean everything is perfect.

Odds are you fall into one of these six kinds of relationships with your 401k. Let’s put them under the microscope and see what’s going well and what flaws might exist.


The Giver

You are constantly contributing to your 401k. 10%, 15%, or 20%―it doesn’t matter. Anything to keep your 401k by your side all the way to retirement. You don’t care what funds you’re in or whether you get an employer match.

Pros: Contributing is numero uno when it comes to a happy relationship with your 401k, and giving all you’ve got to your 401k can cure a lot of ills.

Cons: The $$$ you put in your 401k should be working for you and not the other way around. Throwing your hard earned cash into a money market account or a high fee investment that doesn’t do anything for you can lead to heartbreak.

Things you might say to your 401k: Oh, you only had a 2% rate of return this year? It’s not your fault. Let me just up my contribution level to make you feel better.


The Taker

You set up your 401k… isn’t that enough? Why do you need to check in on it? It should just be grateful that you contribute a few bucks every paycheck.

Pros: Not looking at your 401k and over thinking it can be a virtue.

Cons: If the foundation of the relationship isn’t there, or if you’re not properly invested, this relationship could be going nowhere.

Things you might say to your 401k: Stop complaining, I could be spending my money elsewhere.


The Controller

One look at you and anyone can tell you care about your 401k. You are very attentive, but somewhere in all that effort you’re putting towards your 401k, you may start to suffocate it with your demands and restrictions.

Pros: You care, you really REALLY do. Attention is important after all, it’s your retirement we’re talking about.

Cons: Too much attention can lead to irrational reactions.

Things you might say to your 401k: What do you mean, your balance is less this statement than last statement? This relationship is OVER!


The Enthusiast/Thrill Seeker

You are always looking for something new. Investing in the same funds just doesn’t do it for you. You’re willing to be a little reckless if it means your portfolio is different from others.

Pros: You live on the edge and are likely to take on more risk in your investments, which can net out.

Cons: 401ks are a long term deal, so changing it up constantly and seeking out the new can lead to betting it all on a potentially bad choice – see bitcoin.

Things you might say to your 401k: Bonds? What are those? Hey baby, let’s time the market.


The Overlooker

You know your relationship with your 401k has problems. Maybe you’re under-diversified or have a high expense ratio, but it’s not “that bad”.

Pros: You’re aware. As they say: knowledge is half the battle.

Cons: Close only counts in hand grenades and horseshoes. This is your retirement and every dollar counts. Every opportunity you miss to fix what you know is wrong is money left on the table.

Things you might say to your 401k: I’ve been with my financial advisor for years. Who cares if he charges me too much to rebalance you?


The Jealous One

You are constantly looking at other people’s 401ks and seeing what they have that you don’t – better funds line ups, more money, rate of return, etc.

Pros: You want your 401k to be the best. That’s why you’re always looking around.

Cons: Not all 401ks are the same and neither are individual financial situations. Measuring your 401k against someone else’s is a fool’s errand and can get you off track or distracted.

Things you might say to your 401k: Bob’s 401k grew 15% this year. Why did you only grow 12%?


Want to take your 401k relationship to the next level? Start with a free analysis with the experts at blooom.

 

Start Your 401k Analysis

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Is your 401k naughty or nice?

The year is almost over and it’s time to evaluate how you have done for yourself financially. 401k included! Much like Santa’s reindeers, your 401k can be the driving force for a jolly retirement. Here are some easy ways to find out if your account has been naughty or nice.




If your 401k looks like it could use a little more jingle, no worries! Blooom can get you back on track. Here’s to a happy holiday and a healthy new year!

Get Your 401k Analysis

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Bad Boss Good 401k

That Son-Of-A-Bitch Boss Taught Me the Importance of My 401k

It was a Saturday morning and the creative team was huddled in the office of the Executive Creative Director. The night before, he’d scrapped all the work we’d done the previous two weeks. So all ten of us waited there in his office at 8 a.m.

Bob walked in and said, “Well, the creative work for the pitch sucked. I need three new TV campaigns, outdoor and radio by Sunday night for the pitch on Monday at 8 a.m.”

Poof. There Goes the Weekend

Ted, a budding Art Director asked, “Bob, what was wrong with the work we did last week?”

Bob responded, “There’s a toilet in every room, huh?” Insinuating Ted was a bowl of crap…or his work was. I’m not sure.

I knew at that minute there had to be a better job for me. Have you ever felt this way?

This situation I was sitting in wasn’t anything new. Bob would call and tell me to get to the office for the next client pitch on a regular basis — always after hours. And – of course – it was always due yesterday. I’d work nights and weekends. I’d pulled all-nighters. And as a young 22 year old, I took the beatings and berating. And I produced.

As much as I wanted to quit, I also had to put food on the table, pay the bills, and try to keep my head above water. The bills were still coming and I couldn’t afford to leave. Plus, even if I jumped to another job, I could end up with the same or worse problems.

Have you ever felt stuck? You’re not alone. Many people stuck are in “dead-end” jobs. In fact, 52.3% of Americans are unhappy at work.

There Are Solutions to Getting Out. For Most: It’s Your 401k

I wish I could say some bolt of lightning hit me and I knew that my 401k was my path to salvation. But the truth is, I just signed up for it because my dad had always told me “pay yourself first, son.”

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