Category : planning

Ep. 269 Dough Roller Blog The Money Podcast

Dough Roller Blog: Blooom Helps Your 401k for $10 a Month

CEO and Co-Founder Chris Costello appears on Rob Berger’s Dough Roller Blog “The Money Podcast” to discuss how blooom helps people manage their workplace retirement accounts. Whether it’s a 401k, 403b or T.S.P., we automate the process of selecting and rebalancing your investments.

In the interview, Chris gives an update on recent pricing changes and service offering enhancements at blooom. First, Chris discusses the reasons for the shift toward the low, flat rate of $10 a month.

In addition to the retirement account automation, we also now offer financial planning advice to our clients. They can chat with a representative with financial questions or important decisions. Chris and Rob discuss the feature and how the reasons for blooom’s founding helped shape the advice service offering. Regardless of whether it’s tough choices when saving for a college or deciding on a home purchase or refinance, we can help.

Want to hear the podcast in its entirety …

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Mixtape Vol. 1: Master Your Retirement Jam

Awesome Mixtape Vol. 1: How to Master Your Retirement Jam

Ooga-chaka Ooga-Ooga
Ooga-chaka Ooga-Ooga
Ooga-chaka Ooga-Ooga

That freakin’ opening number in the Guardians of the Galaxy Awesome Mix featuring “Hooked on a Feeling!” It set the mood for the entire soundtrack and would most definitely get Baby Groot movin’.

We LOVE music in the office – control of the SONOS is a perpetual war of will! And who doesn’t get hooked on a good mixtape? It’s such the perfect way to communicate a feeling.

It was about a month ago my mixtape nostalgia was rekindled again. I discovered a great card game called MIXTAPE on a favorite podcast of mine, The Chalkboard Podcast.

I immediately ran out and bought it. With question cards like “What song plays as you ride a lion to work in slow motion?” how could I resist?

For me, a child of the 80s and 90s, it’s awesome to see the mixtape culture make a comeback.

But Don’t Call It A Comeback! We Look Forward To Retirement

And that card got me thinking – though I spun the idea of nostalgia … of looking back, into what if we looked forward toward retirement. The day you decide to retire or give your notice of retirement, what song plays in your head (i.e. what’s your theme music for this moment)?

I posed the question to the blooom team. I got enough submissions to create not just ONE, but TWO volumes (our Engineering ninjas get their own – along with my addition).

Without further ado, I proudly present blooom’s Awesome #Mixtape Vol. 1: Master Your Retirement Jam (You can listen to the Spotify playlist for everything but Beyonce and read my commentary about each selection in italics):

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Millennials Drink Your Coffee

Coffee Is Not The Enemy of Your Retirement

Can you think of starting your day without a cup of your freshly brewed coffee? I bet you can’t!

I can’t either. I love coffee. So … apparently do you. In spades.

But, take a minute and think…. is getting that morning buzz more important than creating your retirement nest egg? According to some recent research, coffee is the enemy of your retirement.

I’m sorry. It simply isn’t.

The Right Steps Don’t Discriminate Against Coffee

In my last post, I lamented the clickbait financial wisdom exclaiming how if we just gave up our latte, we’d be rich. Little did I know at the time that Acorn had based an entire survey question around the dreaded cup of coffee.

In their Money Matters survey, the findings reveal that 41% of millennials – my generation – spend more money on coffee than investing in our future. (1.)

The SAME survey of 1,911 Millennials (914 of the respondents were 24-35 vs. 18-23) also found that Retirement (at more than 40% of respondents) was the group’s top financial concern. It outpaced Daily Expenses and Debt.

Then I found this Forbes Fake News Fact Check gem bolstering the Millennial cause. Could Millennials actually be better at saving for retirement than previous generations? The article references an American Enterprise Institute study where, in 2015, Millennials reported that they first began saving for retirement at age 23, versus age 28 for Generation X and age 34 for Baby Boomers.

If you believe the anti-coffee hype, apparently my generation isn’t thinking rationally about saving for our retirement. That might be true, but we’d be placing the blame on the wrong thing.

The Right Steps Include Paying Yourself First

Just to set things straight, our advisor team doesn’t warn clients about the evils of coffee.

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My Retirement Vision

Wanted: Superior Retirement! Rocking Chairs Need Not Apply

Retirement used to be a word that had a very clear definition to me. Basically, it meant you stop working, eat dinner at 4:30 p.m., and spend your golden years sitting in a rocking chair.

When I was a young man this was my vision of retirement. You kick back enjoying the fruits of decades of labor. It seemed perfectly logical at the time. Didn’t everybody wake up at 6 a.m. and work 60-plus hours a week in a job they couldn’t stand for 40 or so years?

Over time my perception of retirement has changed dramatically. But no matter what my vision of retirement looks like, the path to get there is the same…ACHIEVE FINANCIAL INDEPENDENCE.

Now I like to think of myself as a 45-year-old millennial. Yes, I know that sounds odd. But I do respect my younger counterparts’ idea of retirement. Who wouldn’t want a future that involves doing what you love and taking time to see the world?

Also, the idea that happy is the new rich — a life less focused on acquiring stuff and more about real experiences connecting with people — really appeals to me. This mindset helps when it comes to financial independence. You need less money if you have less stuff.

So if this is what the typical millennial believes in, I swipe right. Let’s take a moment and travel through how my retirement vision has changed:

1. My 20s Retirement Vision…

In my youth, I had a lot of young man wishes. I’m going to make millions of dollars, purchase a mega mansion with an eight-car garage for all my high-end sports cars, and travel the world on my yacht Lonely Island style.

Now, those ideas make me think…That is WAY too much house to clean! How much would tires cost for that car? And if I’m really being honest, I get seasick standing on a dock.

At some point, adulting does happen and perceptions can change. And no matter what you envision retirement to look like, a plan is a must (if you’re currently in your 20s and can set your plan now, you’re one of the lucky ones).

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Tired Financial Advisor

C’mon! Who Wouldn’t Want $10,000 and Free Breakfast?

Early in my career as a financial advisor I was sitting at a local restaurant waiting on a friend to have breakfast.

It was one of those little places where the tables are just a tad too close to each other. I was early and while I was sitting at the table I overheard the conversation occurring at the table behind me.

Seated were three people. Two of them had on three piece suits and were decked out in fancy jewelry (Rolexes, cuff links…etc.). These two young men looked to be in their late 20s…and I could smell “stock broker” rolling off their $3,000 suits. The third gentleman was clearly a prospect for these two guys – we’ll call him Jim. I could tell they were pressing him hard to move his accounts to their firm. And then came the most egregious thing I’d heard an advisor say in my nearly 20 years as an advisor:

Financial Advisor #1 leaned across the table lifts his head and looks squarely at Jim, “Do you like to make money.”

Jim confidently said, “Well, of course.”

Financial Advisor #2 tapping the table, “How about $10,000?”

Jim meekly replied, “Yea, sounds like a…good amount. That’s a lot of dough.”

Advisor #1 in a dead serious tone says, “Well, we do that for our clients in a single day.”

I almost fell out of my chair.

What a Load of Complete and Total B.S.

You see, Chris and I started our careers in the big brokerage firms. We learned a lot of things, including how many of the financial advisors only cared about hitting sales quotas — at almost any cost. (We never fit in there and subsequently left to start our own independent firm.).

So when I heard the two brokers next to me spouting this garbage, it infuriated me.

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