Category : financial wellness

2016 End of Year Review

A lot can happen in one year…

2016 was no exception. It may have felt like it had more downs than ups, but hey, you made it through. And if you can make it through 2016 then you can make it through any year.

This year was packed with election prognosticating, Britain Brexiting Europe, and doomsday predictions in China. It also had the potential to be a HORRIBLE year for the markets. Turns out it wasn’t. Nonetheless, it would’ve been exhausting had you actually paid attention to the markets day by day.

Still, we thought it’d be fun to a quick once-over of last year’s stressors… these are events that threw the average investor for a loop. Luckily, you’re not an average investor. We can tell because you’re actually reading this!

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retirement-savings-blooom

Dear People Who Want to Retire

I’m 34-years old and barely a millennial. I’ve worked in finance for 10 years, which relatively speaking, is not a long time, but enough to look back with insight and a vested eye on the future. I grew up in Kansas and double majored in History & Sociology at the University of Kansas so I don’t even have a business or finance degree to impress you with. In college, my interests aligned more with understanding socioeconomic status and how groups of people are treated, rather than supply chain management, retirement savings and investment banking. And if I were going to be really honest with you, my biggest concern during my formative college years was making sure there were enough handbills around the KU campus to promote my rock band’s next show at the Granada Theater.

This all changed after my parents’ divorce. Their divorce immediately threw me into the realm of understanding discount points on mortgages, cost basis calculations on taxable investments, and estate and insurance planning in an effort to help my mother. During the marriage, she never earned much and always relied on my father to handle the finances. After the divorce, she had to rely and trust in others. This included an investment professional who, despite my mother being fresh off a divorce, low income, and insufficient savings, put her in a variable annuity. More on that in a minute.

And then there is my wife who, in her late 20’s, also sought guidance in an advisor. At that time, she was single, no kids, had heaps of school loans, zero IRA’s and insufficient emergency savings. Yet, she left a meeting with a trusted advisor with a term AND a whole life insurance policy. What she failed to leave with was a strategy on how to pay off her student loans or a plan for retirement savings.

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Why should 401k Advisors care about financial wellness?

Financial wellness…What exactly is it and what’s all the buzz about anyway? For starters, here’s a quick overview, along with three reasons why plan level advisors really should start taking financial wellness seriously.

Financial wellness is the state of personal knowledge and access to resources to plan for and help manage fundamental financial events, which everyone is likely to face – budgeting, saving, transacting, borrowing, protecting, and investing. The typical talking points about financial wellness revolve around how financial instability affects employees and employers – lost productivity, increased work comp, medical and disability claims, theft, turnover, etc. Important stuff?! Advisors SHOULD care, but so far it doesn’t seem like advisors are fully on board. Maybe it’s simply due to the fact that nobody’s honestly discussed how it affects your piece of the pie.

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