Don’t Sit: How to Rollover Your 401k

Congrats! You’ve landed a new job (never a doubt) and didn’t even have to list us as a reference (Oh, the accolades we would’ve thrown your way). While you’re busy getting acclimated to your new work digs, if you have a 401k with your previous employer, don’t forget to bring it with you, along with your trusty stapler. Here are a couple options on how to roll it over:    

Direct rollover to new company plan

If you plan on performing a direct rollover of your old account, first check to make sure your new employer’s retirement plan will accept 401k rollovers. If so, contact the 401k administrator at your new company for a new account address [Example: ABC 401k Plan FBO (for the benefit of) YOUR NAME]. Once you fill out all required paperwork, your 401k funds will either be transferred directly from your old plan to the new plan, or mailed to you as a check made out to the new account address. Just make sure to turn it over to your new company’s 401k administrator.

Rollover to an IRA

You can also roll over your 401k to a traditional IRA, either by transferring the funds to your existing traditional IRA, or by opening a new IRA to receive the funds. No dollar limit is required for either one. You can also roll over – or convert – your non-Roth 401k money to a Roth IRA. The taxable portion of your distribution from the 401k plan will be included in your income at the time of the rollover.

Leave it where it is.

Sometimes the best move you can make with your 401k is to not make any move at all. At least for the time being. For instance, If you’re happy with the investment alternatives your former job offers, or if you need some more time deciding your next move, or if your new company requires a certain amount of time before you can participate in their 401k plan, you may be able to simply leave your 401k where it is.  

Cash out.

Please advise, we only recommend this as a “last resort” option. After you leave your previous employer, you can choose to withdraw your 401k funds in a lump sum after leaving your previous employer. To do this, request that your 401k plan administrator cut you a check. While the check amount will look great in your hands, remember that cashing out could put a dent in your retirement savings, plus you may be faced with significant taxes and penalties in the short term, too.

Of course, not all 401k plans are created equal. So before you make a final decision, we’ll help you choose the best fit for your retirement goals. Hey, it’s what we’re here for, so let’s chat.  

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